Heartbleed

So looking at XKCD you’d think ‘How could they possibly let this bug go?’ That’s so obvious:

Looking at this other blog that purports to show the code causing the issue (and I do look at various forms of computer code daily) you’d say ‘How the heck would they ever know this is a problem?’ Perhaps we shouldn’t be allowed to code in C. The fix:

The fix

The most important part of the fix was this:

/* Read type and payload length first */
if (1 + 2 + 16 > s->s3->rrec.length)
    return 0; /* silently discard */
hbtype = *p++;
n2s(p, payload);
if (1 + 2 + payload + 16 > s->s3->rrec.length)
    return 0; /* silently discard per RFC 6520 sec. 4 */
pl = p;

This does two things: the first check stops zero-length heartbeats. The second check checks to make sure that the actual record length is sufficiently long. That’s it.

OK, maybe I see somewhere there a related fix they descibe. I suppose if one gets over the ‘s->s3->rrec.length’ it makes sense as long as they are doing that (I assume) pointer *p++ right too. And pl=p, that’s totally obvious!

If you look here it wasn’t looking to request lengths at all before the fix. Some QA! If the technology is to allow you to request a number of letters and you don’t test that you can get more than you should that is still sort of bad.

Thank goodness for SQL, Java, and Python! Even thank goodness for Mumps (the programming language). At least (not in Mumps) then you could make the request an object of the requested length and drop everything else.

This site was secure I found thanks to it using forward secrecy (at least since the conversion to Debian – seems like the old version of FreeBSD was unaffected as well). No idea how it was using that but phew! Since ran some SSL check and we’re an even more tight ship now!

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